Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register ) · FlashChat

 
Closed TopicStart new topic
> A How to: Clean brake System, Lots of pics
bnt83
post Apr 3 2006, 11:11 AM
Post #1


Wrench
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 582
Joined: 2-August 05

From: Nebraska
Member No.: 4183
Time Spent On Forums:
1d 19h 35m 49s




Cleaning and Flushing your Brake Systems

The FZR series motorcycles are an aging line of bikes, and with a little TLC these bikes will be on the road for many years to come and will be safe to ride.

An overlooked component that is vital to motorcycle safety is your brakes. Brake pads are not the only thing that needs to be replaced to maintain your brake system. Brake fluid is subject to the same degradation as everything else. Brake fluid absorbs moisture rapidly when exposed to the atmosphere which can lead to corrosion inside the brake system.

I have personally seen corrosion make my rear brake caliper junk. Although corrosion is not the only problem with old brake fluid, it needs to be flushed I would say at least every few years. Flushing removes contaminates that can block the tiny orifices in the master cylinders. With a blockage in the master cylinder you can apply the brakes and they may grab and not release. When the brakes get hot from the friction the fluid in the lines gets hot and applies the brakes harder until they lock up and/or warp the rotors etc. Brake lines are also a great item to watch or just replace. Make sure there are no cracks in the hoses and that they are not pinched or twisted.

This is a general procedure to clean your bake calipers by taking them apart and flushing the lines and master cylinders. This write up will help you remove and disassemble your calipers to clean them to minimize possibility of the calipers sticking and/or leaking. It is simple and cost little money.

All you need is regular tools like screwdrivers, air compressor, blow gun, pliers, wrenches, plenty of clean new brake fluid (a quart of Type DOT 4), soap and water and tooth brushes, Q-tips, scotch brite pads, and anything else to make the job easier.

This procedure is a general procedure and should work form most makes and models. It will focus on how to disassemble the brake system to clean it. This is not required every year or anything, it is more of a just to see what condition it is in and clean everything really well.

Disks: I do not know which disks from which years will fit what bikes. I believe the disks from any year and model (FZR 400 or 600) will fit any year front wheel. Some disks are dished at the center rotor carrier and some are straight. Straight ones can be used in place of dished ones with little modification. Check out this link HYPERLINK "http://www.fzrarchives.com/ipb/index.php?showtopic=17926&hl=brake" http://www.fzrarchives.com/ipb/index.php?s...=17926&hl=brake for info on this.

Calipers: The brake calipers in the pictures below are four piston ones. These calipers will only fit later model front forks. If you have two piston calipers on your bike these will not fit. The early 89 models FZR 600 originaly had two piston type and later years had four piston type. 88-89 FZR 400s in the USA all originally had two piston ones and 1990s had four piston ones. The brake calipers are the same between the 400 and 600, as long as they have the same number of pistons.
Front brake anatomy










This is what 2 piston front brake caliper looks like next to a fork that needs 4 piston calipers.

Rear Brake Anatomy





Removing and disassembling the rear is the same as the front.

When working on the rear pull the slip on muffler off. It makes working on it much easier. I even take it off to clean the rear wheel.

I won't go into taking the rear all apart, beacause it is the same as the front.

Disassembly and cleaning front brake system

First off remove the brake pad by removing the dust cover.



Then remove the clips in the brake pad retaining pins. You may have to take needle nose pliers to turn the brake pad retaining pin to move the clip into a position where you can grab it.



Then remove the pad retaining pins by pulling them out. You may need pliers.

This post has been edited by bnt83: Apr 12 2006, 01:57 PM


--------------------
Complete inverted fully adjustable gsxr front end with wheel for sale ready for you fzr front end swap with Nissan brakes. $200 shipped in the USA

Airplane: 1962 Cessna 150 *******SOLD*******
Car: 2002 Chevy Impala *******SLATED TO BE REPLACED********
Bikes:1988 3EN FZR 400 EXUP WAIT it's now a 1988 3EN FZR 400 w/ a 1995 FZR 600 engine 520 chain and sprokets. ****SOLD****
1982 Kawasaki KZ750E *******FOR SALE****
1987 Yamaha FZ 700 ****SOLD****
2002 Harley Davidson Electra Glide Standard ****SOLD****
Never seen a 3EN check out my thread: Clicky Here
Need help with brakes? Clicky Here
Need help with forks? Clicky Here
Need an FZR 600 Manual? Clicky Here
You need and FZR 400 Manual? Clicky Here
FZR 400 - 400 engine + 600 engine = Door blowing fun!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bnt83
post Apr 3 2006, 11:15 AM
Post #2


Wrench
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 582
Joined: 2-August 05

From: Nebraska
Member No.: 4183
Time Spent On Forums:
1d 19h 35m 49s






Then remove the pads. You can push the pad up with your fingers from the underside of the caliper so that you can get a better grip on the top of the pad.





Then remove the remaining pad



Then you are left with a caliper that is empty. Repeat this process to the caliper on the other side. Notice the pistons. There are four of them in a four piston brake caliper like these. There are only two in early model two piston designs.



Then you may begin taking them apart.

First break loose the parting flange bolts on each side for both calipers. Do one bolt at a time then tighten them lightly (little more than finger tight)

Then break lose the caliper mounting bolts.

Then Pump the front brake lever a few times to push the pistons out of their calipers. This will make removing the pistons easier later after taking the calipers off the forks. (I did not do this and you can see in the pictures below that all the pistons are nearly fully retracted in the caliper bodies, and they were a pain in the ass to get out.)

Then break lose the banjo bolts and unscrew them. Save the copper washers that are located on each side of the banjo fitting on the end of the hose. DO NOT LOSE THEM. Hold the hose in a container and allow the fluid to drain from the hose.

Un-bolt the caliper from the fork and remove it.

Remove the cap on the bleed screw and loosen the bleed screw with a wrench and turn it counter-clockwise and let fluid in the caliper drain out from the banjo bolt boss and the bleed screw. Unscrew the bleed screw completely and check for corrosion. If you let the caliper drain it will be less messy later on.

Then take an air blow gun and push compressed air into the banjo bolt boss. Be careful how you do so because the pistons will pop out of the calipers with a “BANG” and may injure you. Sometimes they can be real sticky and be difficult to remove but you can do it. You will need to be resourceful and plug holes or blow into the hole that links the two pistons together to get the remaining piston to pop out. Just play with them and you can get it done.





Then take the parting flange bolts all the way out and this is what you will have. You cannot predict which piston will come out first but this will give you a good idea of how to deal with the rest of the process.

After removing the parting flange bolts, set the o-ring in a soapy water bath and DO NOT LOOSE THEM!!!



You are going to have to play around with them to get the rest of the pistons out covering holes and apply pressure to one hole to make them pop out.

This post has been edited by bnt83: Apr 12 2006, 07:45 AM


--------------------
Complete inverted fully adjustable gsxr front end with wheel for sale ready for you fzr front end swap with Nissan brakes. $200 shipped in the USA

Airplane: 1962 Cessna 150 *******SOLD*******
Car: 2002 Chevy Impala *******SLATED TO BE REPLACED********
Bikes:1988 3EN FZR 400 EXUP WAIT it's now a 1988 3EN FZR 400 w/ a 1995 FZR 600 engine 520 chain and sprokets. ****SOLD****
1982 Kawasaki KZ750E *******FOR SALE****
1987 Yamaha FZ 700 ****SOLD****
2002 Harley Davidson Electra Glide Standard ****SOLD****
Never seen a 3EN check out my thread: Clicky Here
Need help with brakes? Clicky Here
Need help with forks? Clicky Here
Need an FZR 600 Manual? Clicky Here
You need and FZR 400 Manual? Clicky Here
FZR 400 - 400 engine + 600 engine = Door blowing fun!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bnt83
post Apr 10 2006, 06:27 PM
Post #3


Wrench
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 582
Joined: 2-August 05

From: Nebraska
Member No.: 4183
Time Spent On Forums:
1d 19h 35m 49s








Then you will be left with two empty caliper halves like this.



Then it is time to remove the seals and soak them in hot soapy water.

Remove them carefully as you will be re-using them.









That’s all there is to disassembling the calipers. Now spend lots of time cleaning them up. Make sure to get the seal groves squeaky clean use toothpicks and flat pieces of plastic to scrape any dried crap out of them.

Take scotch brite pad and scrub the outside of the pistons to remove all contaminates and check their condition.

Be sure to inspect the seals themselves. The smaller dust seal is not a critical item but the large seals are and must be in good condition.

When you re-assemble them take a Q-tip and dip it into clean brake fluid and fill the seal groves with new brake fluid. I like to soak the seal in new brake fluid while re-assembling them. Lube the outside diameter of the pistons with brake fluid.

Put the seals in and then just press the pistons back into the bodies with your hands. They should slide right in, they may bind if they are not straight in the hole.

Then lube up the parting flange seals and bolt the calipers back together.


Master Cylinders

Front master cylinder

To inspect the contents of the fluid in the front master cyliner:

Turn the handle bars the the right and break loose the screw on the resivoir cover.

Then turn the handle bars to the left and finish removing the screws and cover.

You must do it this way to prevent the fluid in the resivoir from running out the top

Look inside it. It should look like this, the fluid should be clear (the camera made the fluid look dark) and the bottom of the resivior should be spottles. You should take out the metal tab to check under it.



Clean up the rubber diaphragm and the cover to prevent fluid contamination.



Do not fill the resivoir full or it will leak and ruin any paint it remains on for more than 5 minutes.

When the brake system has been opened up you must bleed the system to remove any air that may have entered the system. Air is compressable and when it is in your brake system it will give you spongey brakes that do not operate well.

The rear caliper is a pain to bleed, so here is some help. For the rear brake caliper, the hose goes from the MC up and back down to the caliper. This allows air to be traped at the high point in the line.

REAR Caliper Bleeding:
1. Unscrew the banjo bolt, pull the bolt out of the brake line. Set the bolt aside. Loosen the bleed screw.

2. Remove the brake pads from caliper. Then remove caliper from the bracket.

3. Unscrew the master cylinder filling cap and fill with fluid

4. With your left hand hold your index finger and thumb and pinch the loose end of the brake line to cover the holes that the banjo bolt passes through.

5. While doing step 3 slowly pump the brake lever until fluid is squirting out of the line between your fingers. REMEMBER you will have to keep adding fluid to the reservoir to make sure you don't pump air back into the line. Hold the line up high and continue at least one more pump.

Keep Loose end of brake line up in the air to prevent fluid from running out and air entering the line.

6. Put the banjo bolt back into the brake line making sure there is a copper crush gasket under the head.

7. Then pick up the caliper with one hand and screw the banjo bolt into the caliper with a copper crush gasket on caliper side of the bolt. Snug the Banjo bolt down with wrench.

8. Bolt the caliper back on the bracket. And reinstall the brake pads.

9. With one bleed screw loose, slowly press brake lever all the way and hold, tighten the bleed screw and slowly release the brake lever.

10. Repeat step 9 until fluid runs out of bleed screw REMEBER to keep the master cylinder reservoir full of fluid at all times. Repeat for any remaing bleed screws.

11. Check that all bolts are tight and screw on the master cylinder cap.

FRONT Brake System Bleeding

#1 Remove the front master cyliner reservoir cap. You must keep the reservoir full of fluid durring all bleeding operations to prevent air from re-entering the system.

#2 Make sure all banjo bolts are tight and that the bleed screws are tight.\

#3 Loosen one hose on the front caliper and remove it.

#4 Pinch banjo fitting on the end of this loose hose with you thumb and index finger and pump the brake lever slowly until fluid squirts out between your fingers. (this is priming the master cylinder)

#5 Re-install the brake hose and tighten the banjo bolt

#6 Pump the brake lever and watch in the reservoir for air bubbles. Air bubbles comming up from the master cylinder means that the brake hoses and calipers are filling with fluid

#7 After pumping the brake lever for what seems like eternity you should feel the brake lever getting stiffer as if your brakes are working but are spongey.

#8 Now you have to bleed the air out of the calipers

#9 With the brake lever released or in the not applied position, open a bleed screw on one caliper.

#10 Then slowly press the brake lever watching the fluid that comes out of the bleed screw, and hold the brake lever.

#11 With the brake lever pressed all the way tighten the bleed screw

#12 Slowly release the brake lever

#13 Continue #9 through #12 until no air bubbles come out of the bleed screws and repeat for any remaining bleed screws.

#14 The brake lever should have a solid feel to now and if not continue pumping and bleeding until you do. Check and add fluid if necessary and re-install the reservoir cover.

#15 After a few days of riding bleed the calipers again to assure that all air is out.

This post has been edited by bnt83: Apr 12 2006, 02:03 PM


--------------------
Complete inverted fully adjustable gsxr front end with wheel for sale ready for you fzr front end swap with Nissan brakes. $200 shipped in the USA

Airplane: 1962 Cessna 150 *******SOLD*******
Car: 2002 Chevy Impala *******SLATED TO BE REPLACED********
Bikes:1988 3EN FZR 400 EXUP WAIT it's now a 1988 3EN FZR 400 w/ a 1995 FZR 600 engine 520 chain and sprokets. ****SOLD****
1982 Kawasaki KZ750E *******FOR SALE****
1987 Yamaha FZ 700 ****SOLD****
2002 Harley Davidson Electra Glide Standard ****SOLD****
Never seen a 3EN check out my thread: Clicky Here
Need help with brakes? Clicky Here
Need help with forks? Clicky Here
Need an FZR 600 Manual? Clicky Here
You need and FZR 400 Manual? Clicky Here
FZR 400 - 400 engine + 600 engine = Door blowing fun!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
billy_awesome
post Jun 8 2006, 05:47 AM
Post #4


^^^ My son!
Group Icon

Group: Sponsor
Posts: 2006
Joined: 26-February 06

From: London, Canada
Member No.: 4759
Time Spent On Forums:
8d 4h 32m 0s


Donate to The FZR Archives, I did.





Well first I primed the front master cylinder by taking off the lid(beside the throttle). Made sure it was filled to the top. Took the line off of one of the front calipers and pinched it with my finger. (this is all stated in bnt83's great write-up!) untill there was alot of pressure after a few pumps. Then I attached the banjo fitting back on the caliper and pumped about 100 times to fill the caliper with fluid (I had taken it apart). Then I attached a piece of hose on the caliper bleed screw and put the other end of the tube into the dot4 brake fluid container. Then......loosen the bleed valve....pull down on the brakes.....keep holding it down....tighten back up the bleed valve then let go of the brakes.......while making sure the hose is attached at all times.....


I didnt back bleed before and I was getting no where. I had no hose all the fluid was just going all over my garage floor. AND it didnt work...the second I tried backbleeding it was about 4 or 5 pumps before I had tight brakes again! Certainly made me happy! biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif thanks again bnt83!!!


--------------------



DO YOU FACEBOOK? - FZR FACEBOOK GROUP!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
DJS
post Jun 14 2006, 03:44 AM
Post #5


I just dont care...
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2021
Joined: 10-March 03

From: Wisconsin
Member No.: 1483
Time Spent On Forums:
0d 13h 31m 8s




QUOTE
Well first I primed the front master cylinder by taking off the lid(beside the throttle). Made sure it was filled to the top. Took the line off of one of the front calipers and pinched it with my finger. (this is all stated in bnt83's great write-up!) untill there was alot of pressure after a few pumps. Then I attached the banjo fitting back on the caliper and pumped about 100 times to fill the caliper with fluid (I had taken it apart). Then I attached a piece of hose on the caliper bleed screw and put the other end of the tube into the dot4 brake fluid container. Then......loosen the bleed valve....pull down on the brakes.....keep holding it down....tighten back up the bleed valve then let go of the brakes.......while making sure the hose is attached at all times.....


I didnt back bleed before and I was getting no where. I had no hose all the fluid was just going all over my garage floor. AND it didnt work...the second I tried backbleeding it was about 4 or 5 pumps before I had tight brakes again! Certainly made me happy!
thats just the standard brake bleeding procedure, back-bleeding is when you push the fluid up through the system from the caliper to the master cyinder...

either way works but if you ever tried actual back-bleeding youd see how much easier it is...



QUOTE (Fraidknot @ Jun 7 2006, 09:49 PM) *
Got a write up on back bleeding brakes? I've got an idea...but it's not well developed in my mind...



I've been back-bleeding motorcycle brakes for years, in fact its the only way I ever do it, I've posted the basic write up many times on here since I've been on this site, I did it again just not too long ago actually, do a search for "back bleeding" and you'll find it in those couple posts...

its so much simpler and easier that it isnt even funny, but like I've said before, noone ever seems to listen to me when I say that...


this is a very good and impressive write-up though, more of the write-ups that get done should be this detailed... very good work... thumbup.gif


--------------------
cops just dont see the humor in things anymore...

it really sucks that doing stupid things always has to hurt so bad...

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
blisteringFT
post Nov 1 2006, 09:31 AM
Post #6


Amateur
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 124
Joined: 2-September 06

Member No.: 5446
Time Spent On Forums:
0d 2h 38m 40s




QUOTE (urethanedave @ Jul 24 2006, 08:21 PM) *
As to regards to back bleeding,
I purchased a hand pump that is for bleeding brakes on a car when you dont have someone there to push the peddle down while you open the bleeder screw.
Basic operation is using a vacuum hand pump to draw the fluid from a reserve tank up thru the system and out the top without any air at all. the hand pump was purchased on EBAY and I think it was 35 or 40 bucks. this is a life and time saver for bleading any type of system.


That's exactly what I was thinking when I was reading this. I bought a mitivac vacuum hand pump at a parts store years ago, cost like $20. I've used it to bleed and actually change ALL of the brake and clutch fluid in all of my cars.

I used it to change out all the fluid in my FZR's brakes as well. It's damn easy:

1) open the brake fluid reservoir cap
2) remove the little nipple from the bleed barb on the brake caliper.
3) Put the pump hose onto the bleed barb.
4) open the bleed barb about 1/4 turn or until fluid starts to gently flow through the hand pump into the pump's reservoir. If you open the barb too much, you'll start sucking air.
5) Keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir cap to make sure there is plenty of fluid there - otherwise you start pulling air down the brake lines. Add fluid as needed.
6) Continue until you can see that fresh fluid is being sucked into the vacuum pump.
7) Close the bleed barb, remove the vacuum pump line and move onto the next bleed barb.

The front brake lever is nice and firm now. It was previously a little spongy in colder weather, I'm assuming there was some air in there that was shrinking in the cold.

It's much quicker to bleed the cycle lines than a car's, far far far quicker. I changed out all the fluid and bled all the lines on my FZR in about 30 mimutes. Couldn't believe how easy it was, considering how incredibly hard it is to change spark plugs on this thing. happy.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
rotortech
post Sep 3 2010, 06:30 AM
Post #7


Wrench
Group Icon

Group: Admin
Posts: 4596
Joined: 29-January 10

From: Indianapolis, IN
Member No.: 10559
Time Spent On Forums:
94d 10h 4m 20s




QUOTE (snboarder113 @ Sep 3 2010, 05:06 AM) *
anyone have any other ideas besides air? I cant figure out how to get the pistons out as i dont have an air compressors. If i go to a gas station to the tire station things will that do the trick?


snboarder - look on this same topic about 3 ahead of yours. The guy has a picture of his use of a bicycle stem as an expansion mandrel that grips the inside of the piston to pull it out. Pretty clever. Or you can do what I do for air. I don't have an air compressor so I use an air tank. I get it filled to about 110 psi and it worked just fine for popping out my pistons. You don't need much volume for removing the pistons - just good pressure. I read on another guys blog that he welds a grease (zurk) fitting to the male threads from an old bleeder screw. Then he pumps grease into the caliper to push the pistons out.

The real trick is to get the stuck ones out without blowing the unstuck ones out. This will require the use of C-clamps. Some people let the easy ones pop out and then clamp thick rubber over the bores to maintain pressure on the stuck ones.


--------------------
Read this first then ask questions:
CPR for the FZR

Rotortech
Indianapolis

1994 Yamaha FZR 600 Purchased as project bike Jan 2010
Finished 10 July 2010 My Build Thread with pictures here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fzrbrandon
post Sep 6 2010, 02:15 PM
Post #8


Wrench
Group Icon

Group: Admin
Posts: 5869
Joined: 30-September 08

From: North Hollywood, CA
Member No.: 8433
Time Spent On Forums:
142d 20h 50m 56s




I'll actually clamped an old fork cap to the empty pot in order to get the other piston out. You basically just need to get creative with some c-clamps, small blocks of wood, a bench vise, etc. Keep trying, you'll get them out.


--------------------


www.fzrbrandon.com

!!! 400 & 600 PARTS FOR SALE !!!

Current:

'92 FZR600 - white, red, and black, FZR400 3EN2 Deltabox swingarm, Micron exhaust, DJ Stage 1 jets & needles, FP needle jets, K&N filter w/ airbox, '06 - '07 R6 shock, RT springs & emulators, R6 front master cylinder, Galfer SS brake lines, YZF blue dot front calipers, Vortex / RK 520 conversion, YZF/R6 VR/R, Bridgestone BT-014s, Vortex swingarm spools, Zero Gravity windscreen

'90 FZR400 - Yamaha blue - D&D exhaust, Sharkskinz race body, DJ Stage 1 jets & needles, FP needle jets, FP shift kit, EBC clutch springs, Ohlins shock w/ Hyperco spring, RT springs & emulators, JEM Machine fork preload adjusters, RR adjustable dogbones, MK fork brace, Woodcraft clip-ons & rear sets, Galfer SS brake lines, Vortex / RK 520 conversion, YZF/R6 VR/R, Bridgestone BT-014s, Vortex swingarm spools, Zero Gravity windscreen

Future hybrid - Current inventory: '90 FZR400 frame, FZR400 3TJ Deltabox swingarm & wheel, YZF600 forks & wheel, '05 YZF600 motor, Penske shock, FZR600 3HE dual-lamp upper & lower bodywork, YZF600 tank, 1st Gen. R6 tail

Past:

'89 FZR600 - white, red, and blue, V&H SS exhaust, DJ jet kit, Zero Gravity windscreen
***sold in '91 :( ***
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
rotortech
post May 6 2011, 07:22 AM
Post #9


Wrench
Group Icon

Group: Admin
Posts: 4596
Joined: 29-January 10

From: Indianapolis, IN
Member No.: 10559
Time Spent On Forums:
94d 10h 4m 20s




QUOTE (snboarder113 @ May 1 2011, 06:38 PM) *
Ugh Im soooo close, but I cant get three of them out GRRR. Need a friend with an air compressor.....

I do not have an air compressor and fought this problem also. I bought an air tank and found the last gas station on earth that still has free air and a 120 psi compressor. I just fill the tank and attach a hose with a nozzle on the end. The nozzle has a rubber tip so it will seal tight when pressed into a hole. Since all I need is pressure and very little flow this works great for popping out those stuck pistons. I always use a piece of wood or aluminum to block the pistons from coming out all the way.


--------------------
Read this first then ask questions:
CPR for the FZR

Rotortech
Indianapolis

1994 Yamaha FZR 600 Purchased as project bike Jan 2010
Finished 10 July 2010 My Build Thread with pictures here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Closed TopicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 25th July 2014 - 04:32 AM